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https://www.petri.com/no-back-doors-microsoft-opens-windows-source-code-to-eu-governments Thoughts /nsa/? Is Microsoft running scared that Valve is promoting linux?


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>>2216 calls suspicion "stupidity", uses rigged words like "conspiracy theory" to label these ideas as rediculous. And also denounces TheIntercept. There are many ways that microsoft could aid in helping the government collect data, but besides all these complex tactics like using recent bugs before they are released, simply they can just give data that is naturally collected (cloud storage, data transfers that windows logs etc) to the government because it is NA based and thus must comply with authorative requests.

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>source code now available Free Chinese knock off when?

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Is there any way to confirm the source code governments are looking at will be the same in the actual product? They could just show the source without the NSA/FBI backdoors. Also is it so crazy to suspect BitLocker of being insecure? Explain me why I should trust a non-open source encryption software over an open source alternative.

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>>2217 Look up the author Paul Thurrott >He was formerly the senior technology analyst at Windows IT Pro and the creator of the SuperSite for Windows. Nothing but a shill. I'd say they should put a disclaimer but almost all the staff there has worked with Microsoft making this a pure propaganda outlet.

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>>2219 Well, it's supposedly secure enough that US fields their army's team leaders with laptops encrypted by it. I mean, these guys have maps and FFIs on their laptop so it must demand a pretty high security threshold. But yeah, it's all about trust. If you don't trust proprietary tech at all then get an open source one.

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>>2216 I though we already knew it was backdoored, since 1999. http://www.heise.de/tp/artikel/5/5263/1.html

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>>2249 microsoft is a US based company, they wouldn't ruin their army with the information they could access via reverse encryption

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>>2254 Backdoor works both ways for and against the folks that implement it. A vulnerable security system is a useless compromise.

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>>2256 not really, all you would have to do is have the encryption program save the details of the encryption process (in an encrypted file) then send said file to microsoft, then they know the keys used to generate said encyption on file (the two large primes, or equivalent), thus decrypt and you then have access to their data

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>>2257 It's not about Microsoft having the data, it's about the vulnerability existing in the first place making it so that there's a possibility of unauthorized security breach.

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>>2258 it's not a vulnerability? do you understand how encryption works? I mean the mathematics behind it. All you need to know are the two original primes used, then it becomes a arithmetic situation

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This is laughable. Giving some source code that probably can't be formally confirmed to be the real source to distant organizations that I can't formally trust. If I can't compile it myself it's trash.

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>>2260 so many double negatives D:

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>>2260 This, backdoors arent readily visible and even if Microsoft allotted enough time for gov workers to fully audit the source and even let them compile it, as long as everything is on a Microsoft controlled environment, it doesnt prove anything about the version of the OS they send out to consumers. Even if they did find something Microsoft wouldnt just let them walk away, this is all a waste of everyone's time.

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I hope a government sends a bunch of Kim Peek like savants to memorize the source and leak it for us to get Arch/Windows

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>>2249 The U.S. Federal government just showed what a low threshold of security is "good enough." Wasn't Pvt Benning and Snowdon enough to tip you off? How about the Chinese ripping off every detail about Fed employees.... The government once posted all the details about building a nuclear weapon on the internet... in Farsai, to boot.

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>>2219 No one uses bitlocker if they want a system secure from any government

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>>2291 No terrorist but is there a mirror of the nuclear weapon schematics?

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>>2391 yes, it can be obtained under the freedom of information act. plz request it from fbi.gov and upload it here. >allah akbar

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So what if the backdoor is added by the compiler?

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>>2395 exactly, that's the issue, unless of course the compiler has also been added to their list of software offered for scrutiny

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If a backdoor can just be a bug left in on purpose how are federal goons supposed to find anything? Giant corps like Microsoft have trouble finding bugs in their products. The time and money spent examining alleged Windows source code would be better spent moving everything to a free OS.

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>>2539 They agencies know where to look, of course. It doesn't have to be on purpose, even. Sometimes Microsoft holds back a security update so the agencies have time to exploit them. >The time and money spent examining alleged Windows source code would be better spent moving everything to a free OS. Or just finishing ReactOS already.

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>>2216 >trusting EU governments they're just as corrupt as the USA

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>>2543 hahahahahahaha

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https://masterchan.org/cmd for all your coding needs.